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Driving innovations in manufacturing: Open Access research from DMEM

Strathprints makes available Open Access scholarly outputs by Strathclyde's Department of Design, Manufacture & Engineering Management (DMEM).

Centred on the vision of 'Delivering Total Engineering', DMEM is a centre for excellence in the processes, systems and technologies needed to support and enable engineering from concept to remanufacture. From user-centred design to sustainable design, from manufacturing operations to remanufacturing, from advanced materials research to systems engineering.

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The effect of electrical connection structures on the spectra of radiated partial discharge signals

Ramirez, C. and Moore, P.J. (2005) The effect of electrical connection structures on the spectra of radiated partial discharge signals. In: Electrical Insulation and Dielectric Phenomena, 2005. CEIDP '05. 2005 Annual Report Conference on, 2005-10-16 - 2005-10-19.

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Abstract

Partial discharges (PD) generated in high-voltage equipment can lead to its complete destruction, as damage in external and internal insulation slowly evolves into severe faults. Thus, early detection of this condition is imperative. Recent developments in the application of radiometry to this area have shown how PD can be detected from the vicinity of energized equipment. Radiometric PD detection is advantageous to electric utilities since the high-voltage equipment need not be taken out of service and the measurement can be made from a safe area, without the need for any physical or electrical connection. This paper describes how the electrical connection arrangements influence the emission of radio frequency radiation generated by PD. The radio frequency response of a high-voltage test rig has been measured in order to compensate the received signal for the effect of the structure. The results show that compensated frequency response significantly differs from the uncompensated response.