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Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

Explore research outputs by the European Policies Research Centre...

Determination of correlation lengths in swollen polymer networks by small-angle neutron-scattering

Davidson, N.S. and Richards, R.W. and Maconnachie, A. (1986) Determination of correlation lengths in swollen polymer networks by small-angle neutron-scattering. Macromolecules, 19 (2). pp. 434-441. ISSN 0024-9297

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Abstract

The analogy between semidilute polymer solutions and swollen polymer networks is reviewed and some implications of current theories are considered. Small-angle neutron scattering has been used to measure a characteristic correlation length in randomly cross-linked polystyrene gels at swelling equilibrium in cyclohexane over the range 308-333 K and in toluene at ambient temperature. The equilibrium polymer volume fraction ranged from ca. 0.01 to 0.3, depending on the cross-link density and the solvent used. These results, together with those from earlier quasi-elastic light scattering measurements, were compared with reported scaling laws for polymer solutions. Although similar behavior was noted, the presence of permanent cross-links restricts the region wherein strong excluded volume effects are evident.