Picture of neon light reading 'Open'

Discover open research at Strathprints as part of International Open Access Week!

23-29 October 2017 is International Open Access Week. The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of Open Access research outputs, all produced by University of Strathclyde researchers.

Explore recent world leading Open Access research content this Open Access Week from across Strathclyde's many research active faculties: Engineering, Science, Humanities, Arts & Social Sciences and Strathclyde Business School.

Explore all Strathclyde Open Access research outputs...

Measuring physical activity in children with pedometers: reliability, reactivity, and replacing missing data

Rowe, D.A. and Maher, Matthew T. and Raedeke, Thomas D. and Lore, Joana (2004) Measuring physical activity in children with pedometers: reliability, reactivity, and replacing missing data. Pediatric Exercise Science, 16 (4). pp. 343-354. ISSN 0899-8493

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

The study was undertaken to evaluate (a) the reliability of pedometer data and reactivity of children to wearing a pedometer, (b) the effectiveness of a missing data replacement procedure, and (c) the validity of the Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire (LTEQ). Six days of pedometer data were collected from 299 middle-school children, followed by administration of the LTEQ. Six days of pedometer data were found to be adequately reliable for research into habitual physical activity (Rxx = .79) and no reactivity occurred. Inclusion of weekday and weekend scores is recommended where possible. The individual-centered data-replacement procedure did not adversely affect reliability, so this data-replacement method offers great promise to physical activity researchers who wish to maintain statistical power in their studies. The LTEQ does not appear to measure physical activity similarly to pedometers (r = .05), and researchers should use the LTEQ with caution in children until further research explains this discrepancy.