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Variable-temperature and-concentration 1H and 7Li NMR studies of solutions of hexameric iminolithium compounds, (R1R2CNLi)6

BARR, D and SNAITH, R and Mulvey, Robert and WADE, K and REED, D (1986) Variable-temperature and-concentration 1H and 7Li NMR studies of solutions of hexameric iminolithium compounds, (R1R2CNLi)6. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry, 24 (8). pp. 713-717.

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Abstract

Variable-temperature 7Li and proton NMR spectra of four hexameric (in the solid state) iminolithium compounds, (R1R2CNLi)6 [where R1 = Me2N,R2= Ph (1), R1 = R2 = Me2N (2), R1 = But, R2 = Ph (3) and R1 = R2 = But (4)], recorded for toluene-d8, solutions of differing concentrations, are described, and the results are discussed with respect to known solid-state structures. Complex equilibria, probably involving trimeric units and higher aggregates than hexamers, have been detected at low temperatures for solutions of 1 and 2, although similar equilibria do not occur, or are too rapid to detect even at the lowest temperatures attainable, for solutions of 3 and 4.