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Visualisation to enhance biomechanical tuning of ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) in stroke : study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

Carse, Bruce and Bowers, Roy J and Meadows, Barry C and Rowe, Philip J (2011) Visualisation to enhance biomechanical tuning of ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) in stroke : study protocol for a randomised controlled trial. Trials, 12. ISSN 1745-6215

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Abstract

There are a number of gaps in the evidence base for the use of ankle-foot orthoses for stroke patients. Three dimensional motion analysis offers an ideal method for objectively obtaining biomechanical gait data from stroke patients, however there are a number of major barriers to its use in routine clinical practice. One significant problem is the way in which the biomechanical data generated by these systems is presented. Through the careful design of bespoke biomechanical visualisation software it may be possible to present such data in novel ways to improve clinical decision making, track progress and increase patient understanding in the context of ankle-foot orthosis tuning.