Picture of boy being examining by doctor at a tuberculosis sanatorium

Understanding our future through Open Access research about our past...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Centre for the Social History of Health & Healthcare (CSHHH), based within the School of Humanities, and considered Scotland's leading centre for the history of health and medicine.

Research at CSHHH explores the modern world since 1800 in locations as diverse as the UK, Asia, Africa, North America, and Europe. Areas of specialism include contraception and sexuality; family health and medical services; occupational health and medicine; disability; the history of psychiatry; conflict and warfare; and, drugs, pharmaceuticals and intoxicants.

Explore the Open Access research of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Image: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Wellcome Collection - CC-BY.

Comparative study between young children of different societies to evaluate the impact of feeding style on the nutritional status

Reilly, John J and Al-Othman, A.M. and Belton, N.R. (2006) Comparative study between young children of different societies to evaluate the impact of feeding style on the nutritional status. Journal of Medical Sciences, 6 (1). pp. 12-17. ISSN 1682-4474

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

There were three Parental Feeing Styles (PFS) identified. This study was aimed to find differences between these three styles. One hundred and seventy seven Saudi children from Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and 30 British children from Edinburgh, UK, aged 6 to 36 months were selected randomly from baby clinic files of primary care centres. Anthropometric measurements, blood samples, food frequency questionnaire and four food weighed intake were used to collect data. This study presents, for the first time, measurements of PFS in contemporary children from the two countries, but there was no evidence found for any impact of PFS on nutrient intake, nutritional status, or growth of children.