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Electrochemiluminescent metallopolymers for the detection of biological analytes

O'Reilly, Emmet J and Dennany, Lynn and Keyes, Tia E and Forster, Robert J. (2007) Electrochemiluminescent metallopolymers for the detection of biological analytes. In: 234th Meeting of the American Chemical Society, 2007-08-17 - 2007-08-23.

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Abstract

Electrochemiluminescence (ECL) represents a sensitive and potentially selective approach to detecting biomolecules ranging from DNA to protein and antibody biomarkers. ECL production is highly dependent upon the rate of charge transfer (DCT). Non-conjugated metallopolymers that have previously been reported for ECL production suffer from a relative slow rate of charge transfer compared to metallopolymers that support a π conjugated network along the polymer backbone. Here, we report on the development of ruthenium containing conjugated metallopolymers with enhanced rates of charge transfer for use in ECL production. These metallopolymers have been developed with conjugated backbones which have previously been shown to aid in the communication between adjacent metal centres. The electrochemiluminescent, electrochemical and photophysical properties of the metallopolymers have been extensively studied and are reported herein