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Driving innovations in manufacturing: Open Access research from DMEM

Strathprints makes available Open Access scholarly outputs by Strathclyde's Department of Design, Manufacture & Engineering Management (DMEM).

Centred on the vision of 'Delivering Total Engineering', DMEM is a centre for excellence in the processes, systems and technologies needed to support and enable engineering from concept to remanufacture. From user-centred design to sustainable design, from manufacturing operations to remanufacturing, from advanced materials research to systems engineering.

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Model validation and coordinated operation of a photovoltaic array and a diesel power plant for distributed generation

Canever, D. and Dudgeon, G. and Massucco, S. and McDonald, J.R. and Silvestro, F. (2001) Model validation and coordinated operation of a photovoltaic array and a diesel power plant for distributed generation. In: 2001 Power Engineering Society Summer Meeting, Volumes 1-3, Conference Proceedings. IEEE, New York, pp. 626-631. ISBN 0780371739

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Abstract

The tendency in the industrialized countries to significantly improve the contribution of distributed generation in the existing electrical networks poses new technical and economical challenges to power system control and management. Coordination of distributed resources for the control of active power is addressed in this paper. The models of two typical distributed electrical sources - a photovoltaic array (PV) and a diesel driven generation plant (DPP) - are first individually derived and examined. Successively these models have been adapted in view of their reciprocal integration into an existing distribution network. A coordinated management of the two distributed sources is suggested in order to fully exploit the PV renewable energy from the sun. A suitable regulator is derived from secondary control structures typical of large electrical systems by using a power signal exchanged between the two sources. Other possible consequences of this approach are presented with reference to a competitive electric market.