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Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

Explore research outputs by the European Policies Research Centre...

Pulse propagation effects in a cyclotron resonance maser amplifier

Aitken, P and McNeil, B W J and Robb, G R M and Phelps, A D R (1999) Pulse propagation effects in a cyclotron resonance maser amplifier. Physical Review E: Statistical Physics, Plasmas, Fluids, and Related Interdisciplinary Topics, 59 (1). pp. 1152-1166. ISSN 1063-651X

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Abstract

An analysis is presented of a cyclotron resonance maser amplifier operating with electron pulses. The electrons are resonant at two frequencies of the same waveguide mode. We consider both a single resonant frequency interaction and also a coupled two resonant frequency interaction. It is shown that, in general, the interaction with both resonant frequencies must be taken into account. The analysis includes propagation effects due to the difference between the axial velocity of the electrons and the group velocities of the radiation fields. Both linear and numerical solutions to the equations are given, and superradiant emission is demonstrated where the radiated power scales as the square of the electron pulse current. Two methods of low-frequency suppression are presented allowing the high-frequency emission to dominate. These results may have important consequences for the generation of short pulses of high-frequency, high-power microwave radiation. [S1063-651X(99)01001-6].