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Novel enrofloxacin imprinted polymer applied to the solid-phase extraction of fluorinated quinolones from urine and tissue samples

Caro, Ester and Marcé, Rosa M. and Cormack, Peter A.G. and Sherrington, David C. and Borrull, Francesc (2006) Novel enrofloxacin imprinted polymer applied to the solid-phase extraction of fluorinated quinolones from urine and tissue samples. Analytica Chimica Acta, 562 (2). pp. 145-151. ISSN 0003-2670

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Abstract

A new molecularly imprinted polymer, prepared following a non-covalent approach, was synthesised using enrofloxacin as a template molecule. The imprinting effect of the polymer was verified by chromatographic evaluation and, interestingly, this evaluation also revealed that the imprinted polymer showed a high degree of cross-reactivity for ciprofloxacin, the major metabolite of enrofloxacin. The molecularly imprinted polymer was then applied as a selective sorbent in a two-step solid-phase extraction method focussing upon complex biological matrices, specifically human urine and pig liver. This two-step solid-phase extraction protocol, in which a commercial Oasis HLB cartridge and a molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction cartridge were combined, allowed enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin to be determined by liquid chromatography coupled to a UV detector at levels below the maximum residue limits established by the European Union. The quantification and detection limits in tissue samples of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were established at 50 μg kg−1 and 30 μg kg−1, respectively.