Picture of boy being examining by doctor at a tuberculosis sanatorium

Understanding our future through Open Access research about our past...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Centre for the Social History of Health & Healthcare (CSHHH), based within the School of Humanities, and considered Scotland's leading centre for the history of health and medicine.

Research at CSHHH explores the modern world since 1800 in locations as diverse as the UK, Asia, Africa, North America, and Europe. Areas of specialism include contraception and sexuality; family health and medical services; occupational health and medicine; disability; the history of psychiatry; conflict and warfare; and, drugs, pharmaceuticals and intoxicants.

Explore the Open Access research of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Image: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Wellcome Collection - CC-BY.

Generation of powerful ultrashort electromagnetic pulses based on superradiance

Ginzburg, N S and Zotova, I V and Novozhilova, Y V and Sergeev, A S and Phelps, A D R and Cross, A W and Wiggins, S M and Ronald, K and Shpak, V G and Yalandin, M I and Shunailov, S A and Ulmaskulov, M R (2001) Generation of powerful ultrashort electromagnetic pulses based on superradiance. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, 475 (1-3). pp. 385-390. ISSN 0168-9002

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

Experimental results of the observation of superradiation from intense, subnanosecond electron bunches moving through a periodic waveguide and interacting with a backward propagating TM01 wave are presented. The ultra-short microwave pulses in Ka, W, and G band were generated with repetition frequencies of up to 25 Hz. Observation of RF breakdown of ambient air, as well as direct measurements by hot-carrier germanium detectors, leads to an estimate of the peak power as high as 60-120 MW for the 300-400 ps pulses at 38 GHz. The initial observation of 75 GHz 10-15 MW radiation pulses with duration less than 150 ps, and of 150 GHz microwave spikes with a risetime of 75ps are also reported. Comparison with simulations is discussed as well.