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Designing Environments for Life : A Meeting of Art, Anthropology and Design

Ingold, Tim and Anusas, Mike and Clarke, Jennifer and Harkness, Rachel (2010) Designing Environments for Life : A Meeting of Art, Anthropology and Design. [Show/Exhibition]

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Abstract

The primary research output from the Institute for Advanced Studies ground-breaking programme ‘Designing Environments for Life’ - a public exhibition at the world-class Dundee Contemporary Arts. Conceived and led by designer Mike Anusas (programme coordinator and co-convener) and anthropologist Professor Tim Ingold (principle convener) this exhibition was curated and implemented by anthropology doctoral student Jennifer Clarke and anthropologist Dr. Rachel J. Harkness. The exhibition showcased the programme’s international and interdisciplinary ‘meeting of art, anthropology and design’, which occurred between a diverse range of emergent and world-leading academics, artists, designers, makers, musicians, writers, poets and policy makers. The exhibition featured a themed environment of installations, drawings, images and artefacts, intent on provoking direct, critical and intellectual engagement with the programme’s three ambitious aims: to rethink of the concept of environment; to reconsider the meaning of design; to question fundamental notions of creativity. For the exhibition's audience, this critical and intellectual engagement occurred not only through experience and interaction with the space, but also through creative and provocative hands-on workshops which delved deeper into key theoretical and practical themes.