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The role of 3D graphics in NDT data processing

McNab, A. and Reilly, D. and Potts, A. and Toft, M. (2001) The role of 3D graphics in NDT data processing. IEE Proceedings Science Measurement and Technology, 148 (4). pp. 149-158. ISSN 1350-2344

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Abstract

Visualisation in 3-D can significantly improve the interpretation and understanding of imaged NDT data sets, The advantages of using 3-D graphics to assist in the interpretation of ultrasonic data are discussed in the context of an advanced software environment for the reconstruction, visualisation and analysis of 3-D images within a component CAD model. The software combines the analysis features of established 2-D packages with facilities for real-time data rotation, interactive orthogonal/oblique slicing and 'true' image reconstruction, where scanning-surface shape and reflection from component boundaries are accounted for through interaction with the full 3-D model of the component. A number of novel facilities exploit the graphics capability of the system. These include the overlay of 3-D images with individual control of image transparency; a floating tooltip window for interrogation of data point coordinates and amplitude; image annotation tools, including 3-D distance measurement; and automated defect sizing based on '6 dB drop' and 'maximum amplitude' methods. A graphical user interface has also been designed for a well established flaw response model, which allows the user to easily specify the flaw size, shape, orientation and location; probe parameters and scan pattern on the component. The output is presented as a simulated ultrasound image.