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Tracking of physical activity and sedentary behavior in young children

Kelly, L.A. and Reilly, John J and Jackson, D.M. and Montgomery, C. and Grant, S and Paton, Y (2007) Tracking of physical activity and sedentary behavior in young children. Pediatric Exercise Science, 19 (1). pp. 51-60. ISSN 0899-8493

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Abstract

Tracking of total physical activity (PA), moderate to vigorous activity (MVPA), and sedentary behavior was assessed in 42 young children (mean age at baseline 3.8 years) over a 2-year period using the Actigraph accelerometer. Tracking was analyzed using Spearman rank correlations, percentage agreements, and kappa statistics. Spearman rank correlations were r = .35 (p = .002) for total PA, r = .37 (p = .002) for MVPA, and r = .35 (p = .002) for sedentary behavior. Percentage agreements for PA, MVPA, and sedentary behavior were 38, 41, and 26 respectively. Kappa statistics for PA, MVPA, and sedentary behavior ranged from poor to fair. Results suggest low levels of tracking of total physical activity, MVPA, and sedentary behavior in young Scottish children over a 2-year period