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Colloidal quantum dot random laser

Chen, Yujie and Herrnsdorf, Johannes and Guilhabert, Benoit Jack Eloi and Zhang, Yanfeng and Watson, Ian M. and Gu, Erdan and Laurand, Nicolas and Dawson, Martin D. (2011) Colloidal quantum dot random laser. Optics Express, 19 (4). pp. 2996-3003. ISSN 1094-4087

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Abstract

We report random laser action in a system where optical amplification is provided by colloidal quantum dots (CQDs). This system is obtained by depositing from solution CdSe/ZnS core-shell CQDs into rough micron-scale grooves fabricated on the surface of a glass substrate. The combination of CQD random packing and of disordered structures in the glass groove enables gain and multiple scattering. Upon optical excitation, random laser action is triggered in the system above a 25-mJ/cm2 threshold. Single-shot spectra were recorded to study the emission spectral characteristics and the results show the stability of the laser mode positions and the dominance of the modes close to the material gain maximum.