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Open Access research which pushes advances in bionanotechnology

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SIPBS is a major research centre in Scotland focusing on 'new medicines', 'better medicines' and 'better use of medicines'. This includes the exploration of nanoparticles and nanomedicines within the wider research agenda of bionanotechnology, in which the tools of nanotechnology are applied to solve biological problems. At SIPBS multidisciplinary approaches are also pursued to improve bioscience understanding of novel therapeutic targets with the aim of developing therapeutic interventions and the investigation, development and manufacture of drug substances and products.

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Low cost multi-view video system for wireless channel

Abd Manap, Nurulfajar and Di Caterina, Gaetano and Soraghan, John (2009) Low cost multi-view video system for wireless channel. In: 2009 3DTV conference. IEEE, Potsdam, Germany, pp. 1-4. ISBN 9781424443178

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Abstract

With the advent in display technology, the 3DTV will provide a new viewing experience without the need of wearing special glasses to watch the 3D scenes. One of the key elements in 3DTV is the multi-view video coding, obtained from a set of synchronized cameras, capture the same scene from different view points. The video streams are synchronized and subsequently used to exploit the redundancy contained among video sources. A multi-view video consists of components for data acquisition, compression, transmission and display. This paper outlines the design and implementation of a multi-view video system for transmission over a wireless channel. Synchronized video sequences acquired from four separate cameras and coded with H.264/AVC. The video data is then transmitted over a simulated Rayleigh channel through Digital Video Broadcasting-Terrestrial (DVB-T) system with Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM).