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A trial of exercise therapy for women having treatment for breast cancer

Mutrie, Nanette (2010) A trial of exercise therapy for women having treatment for breast cancer. [Report]

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Abstract

This trial looked at the benefit of exercise therapy for women having treatment for early stage breast cancer. Doctors and breast care nurses hoped that exercise would help improve quality of life and reduce feelings of fatigue, anxiety and depression for women having treatment for early stage breast cancer. A small pilot study had showed promising results, but a larger trial was needed to get more reliable results. This trial recruited women who were having either chemotherapy or radiotherapy after surgery for early stage breast cancer. The research team looked at how the treatment affected people physically, mentally and emotionally. The aim of the trial was to find out if it is helpful for women to follow an exercise programme while they are having treatment for breast cancer.