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1.6 W continuous-wave Raman laser using low-loss synthetic diamond

Lubeigt, Walter and Savitski, Vasili G. and Bonner, Gerald M. and Geoghegan, Sarah, L. and Friel, Ian and Hastie, Jennifer E. and Dawson, Martin D. and Burns, David and Kemp, Alan J. (2011) 1.6 W continuous-wave Raman laser using low-loss synthetic diamond. Optics Express, 19 (7). pp. 6938-6944. ISSN 1094-4087

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    Abstract

    Low-birefringence (Δn<2x10−6), low-loss (absorption coefficient <0.006cm−1 at 1064nm), single-crystal, synthetic diamond has been exploited in a CW Raman laser. The diamond Raman laser was intracavity pumped within a Nd:YVO4 laser. At the Raman laser wavelength of 1240nm, CW output powers of 1.6W and a slope efficiency with respect to the absorbed diode-laser pump power (at 808nm) of ~18% were measured. In quasi-CW operation, maximum on-time output powers of 2.8W (slope efficiency ~24%) were observed, resulting in an absorbed diode-laser pump power to the Raman laser output power conversion efficiency of 13%.