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EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

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How a man differs from a dog

Fudge, Erica (2003) How a man differs from a dog. History Today, 53 (6). pp. 38-44. ISSN 0018-2753

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Abstract

In early modern history, numerous vices were represented as having the ability to transform humans into beasts. These representations would appear to play into a theological and moral conceptualization of the world rather than a “zoological” one. An analysis of early modern constructions of perception and the role of the passions reveals a logic in which humans can actually become animals through their actions. The writer discusses the work of Oxford clergyman and author Robert Burton, whose early exploration of self, The Anatomy of Melancholy, drew heavily on the belief that human failings constituted a kind of base animal immorality.