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Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

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An Audio-based sports video segmentation and event detection algorithm

Baillie, M. and Jose, J.M. (2004) An Audio-based sports video segmentation and event detection algorithm. In: IEEE Workshop on Event Mining 2004: IEEE Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, 2004-07-02.

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Abstract

In this paper, we present an audio-based event detection algorithm shown to be effective when applied to Soccer video. The main benefit of this approach is the ability to recognise patterns that display high levels of crowd response correlated to key events. The soundtrack from a Soccer sequence is first parameterised using Mel-frequency Cepstral coefficients. It is then segmented into homogenous components using a windowing algorithm with a decision process based on Bayesian model selection. This decision process eliminated the need for defining a heuristic set of rules for segmentation. Each audio segment is then labelled using a series of Hidden Markov model (HMM) classifiers, each a representation of one of 6 predefined semantic content classes found in Soccer video. Exciting events are identified as those segments belonging to a crowd cheering class. Experimentation indicated that the algorithm was more effective for classifying crowd response when compared to traditional model-based segmentation and classification techniques.