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Twelve month changes in physical activity and quality of life outcomes following a physical activity consultation delivered in person or in written form in Type 2 diabetes : the TIME2ACT study

Kirk, A. and Barnett, Jodi and Leese, Graham and Mutrie, N. (2009) Twelve month changes in physical activity and quality of life outcomes following a physical activity consultation delivered in person or in written form in Type 2 diabetes : the TIME2ACT study. In: American Diabetes Association - 69th Scientific Sessions (2009), 2009-06-05 - 2009-06-09. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Physical activity is an important component of Type 2 diabetes care but underutilized. Physical activity consultations are successful at increasing physical activity in people with diabetes but resources are often limited. Limited research has reported on the effect of physical activity intervention on the quality of life of people with Type 2 diabetes. The TIME2ACT study investigated the 12 month effectiveness of physical activity consultation for people with Type 2 diabetes delivered in person or in written form, compared to controls. 134 people in a contemplation or preparation stage were randomised to receive one of the above interventions. Objective and subjective physical activity was measured over 1 week along with quality of life (SF12v2, PANAS, Wellbeing questionnaire and Vitality scale) and self efficacy for exercise at baseline, and 6 and 12 months post intervention. There was no interaction (time & group) effect in accelerometer counts (P=0.863), step counts (p=0.739), time in moderate intensity or above (P=0.841) and the seven-day recall (p=0.212) over 6 and 12 months. In this group the only intervention effect was for self-efficacy (P=0.01), with an increase (P=0.059) from baseline to 6 months (person-delivered group) and a decrease from baseline to 6 months (P=0.047) (controls). In subgroup analysis of participants (n=36) with baseline pedometer steps <5000/day, the physical activity consultation delivered in person group increased physical activity over 12 months and the controls decreased. In this subgroup changes in quality of life were; a decrease (P=0.002) from baseline to 12 months in controls in the SF12 physical component score and a decrease from baseline to 12 months and 6 to 12 months (P<0.05) in the physical activity consultation delivered in person group in the SF12 mental component score (both changes indicating a better health score). More research is needed investigating methods to promote physical activity in diabetes care. Studies should include quality of life outcomes due to current lack of published data and importance of outcomes to patients.