Picture of DNA strand

Pioneering chemical biology & medicinal chemistry through Open Access research...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Department of Pure & Applied Chemistry, based within the Faculty of Science.

Research here spans a wide range of topics from analytical chemistry to materials science, and from biological chemistry to theoretical chemistry. The specific work in chemical biology and medicinal chemistry, as an example, encompasses pioneering techniques in synthesis, bioinformatics, nucleic acid chemistry, amino acid chemistry, heterocyclic chemistry, biophysical chemistry and NMR spectroscopy.

Explore the Open Access research of the Department of Pure & Applied Chemistry. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Applications of mass spectrometry in metabolomic studies of animal model and invertebrate systems

Kamleh, M.A. and Dow, J.A.T. and Watson, D.G. (2009) Applications of mass spectrometry in metabolomic studies of animal model and invertebrate systems. Briefings in Functional Genomics and Proteomics, 8 (1). pp. 28-48. ISSN 1473-9550

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

Metabolomics provides rich datasets for systems biology. Mass spectrometric (MS) techniques are rapidly gaining in importance for untargeted metabolic profiling. In this review, we survey the various techniques for sample preparation and analysis relating to the various MS techniques and illustrate the potential of these techniques for both observing complete metabolomes and detecting changes in the metabolism resulting from genetic mutation of other perturbations. The use of some of these techniques in the study of model organisms including rodent and various invertebrate models is described. The invertebrate systems are of particular interest since such organisms have valuable mutant resources, such as RNAi panels directed against nearly all the genes in the genome. The demonstration that they are readily compatible with metabolomic approaches is particularly important for systems approaches to metabolic pathways.