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Human computer interaction with mobile devices (editorial for special edition)

Brewster, Stephen and Dunlop, Mark (2000) Human computer interaction with mobile devices (editorial for special edition). Personal Technologies, 4 (2-3). pp. 71-72. ISSN 0949-2054

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Abstract

The second international workshop on human-computer interaction with mobile devices took place on 30th August,1999 as part of the IFIP INTERACT '99 conference held in Edinburgh, UK. We had over 60 participants with an almost equal mix between academic and industrial attendees from within Europe, North America and Asia.The first workshop had been held in Glasgow the year before and was one of the first to bring together researchers interested in how to design usable interfaces for mobile computers. It was such a success that we decided to run another- this was obviously an area where there were many problems and many people looking for solutions. The growth of the mobile computing market is rapid. The take-up of mobile telephones and personal digital assistants has been dramatic - huge numbers of people now own a mobile device of some kind. But there are still big problems with usability - it is hard to design interfaces and interactions with devices that have small or no screens and limited computing resources. This is becoming worse as more and more complexity is being integrated into these small devices.