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Towards a user-centric and multidisciplinary framework for designing context-aware applications

Bradley, N.A. and Dunlop, M.D. (2004) Towards a user-centric and multidisciplinary framework for designing context-aware applications. In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Ubiquitous Computing (Ubicomp 2004). Springer, Berlin, Germany. ISBN 9783540229551

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Abstract

Research into context-aware computing has not sufficiently addressed human and social aspects of design. Existing design frameworks are predominantly software orientated, make little use of cross-disciplinary work, and do not provide an easily transferable structure for cross-application of design principles. To address these problems, this paper proposes a multidisciplinary and user-centred design framework, and two models of context, which derive from conceptualisations within Psychology, Linguistics, and Computer Science. In a study, our framework was found to significantly improve the performance of postgraduate students at identifying the context of the user and application, and the usability issues that arise.