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Researchers at EEE are examining the dynamic analysis of turbines, their modelling and simulation, control system design and their optimisation, along with resource assessment and condition monitoring issues. The Energy Systems Research Unit (ESRU) within MAE is producing research to achieve significant levels of energy efficiency using new and renewable energy systems. Meanwhile, researchers at NAOME are supporting the development of offshore wind, wave and tidal-current energy to assist in the provision of diverse energy sources and economic growth in the renewable energy sector.

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Browsing and searching e-encyclopaedias

Wilson, Ruth and Shortreed, Julie and Landoni, Monica (2004) Browsing and searching e-encyclopaedias. In: Recherche d'Information Assistee par Ordinateur 2004, 2004-04-26 - 2004-04-28.

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Abstract

Educational websites and electronic encyclopaedias employ many of the same design elements, such as hyperlinks, frames and search mechanisms. This paper asks to what extent recommendations from the world of web design can be applied to e-encyclopaedias, through an evaluation of users' browsing and searching behaviour in the free, web-based versions of Encyclopaedia Britannica, the Concise Columbia Encyclopaedia and Microsoft's Encarta. It is discovered that e-encyclopaedias have a unique set of design requirements, as users' expectations are inherited from the worlds of both web and print.