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Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

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Overvoltage protection on a DC marine electrical system

Fletcher, Steven and Norman, P.J. and Galloway, S.J. and Burt, G.M. (2008) Overvoltage protection on a DC marine electrical system. In: Proceedings of the 43rd International Universities Power Engineering Conference. IEEE, pp. 411-415. ISBN 978-1-4244-3294-3

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Abstract

Paper presented at the 43rd International Universities Power Engineering Conference (UPEC), 1-4 Sept, Padova, Italy. This paper analyses the behaviour of a highly capacitive DC marine network under fault conditions and demonstrates how overvoltages can be caused by the redistribution of stored energy following the clearance of a fault. Energy flows of this type can be hard to predict, making it particularly difficult to sufficiently protect the network from such overvoltages. Through simulation of a representative zonal DC marine network, this paper analyses the causes and severity of overvoltages which can occur following a fault and identifies where these overvoltages are likely to occur. The simulations demonstrate how the effects of a fault on the network can propagate, potentially causing damage to previously healthy parts of the network. Finally, the paper discusses the impact of these findings on the operation of network protection.