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Outcomes for paediatric haematopoletic stem cell transplant patients following intensive care admission

Quinn, C.E. and Layden, J. and Young, D. and Gibson, B.E.S. (2008) Outcomes for paediatric haematopoletic stem cell transplant patients following intensive care admission. British Journal of Haematology, 141 (S1). p. 93. ISSN 0007-1048

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Abstract

The role of intensive care in the paediatric stem cell transplant (SCT)patient remains a highly controversial issue. Due to poor survival outcomes (discharge survival rates as low as 28.6% in patients admitted with lung disease) intensivists are often unwilling to admit SCT patients. However, recent studies have revealed that survival rates in children given intensive support are increasing with earlier admission to the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU), improved ventilation strategies, and earlier and better renal replacement therapy. We report the experience of patients from our institution who were admitted to the PICU following haematopoeitic SCT.