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Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

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MEMS microwave device with switchable capacitive and inductive states

Li, L. and Uttamchandani, D.G. (2008) MEMS microwave device with switchable capacitive and inductive states. Micro and Nano Letters, 3 (3). pp. 77-81. ISSN 1750-0443

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Abstract

A microwave microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device that can be switched between capacitive and inductive states over the frequency range of 1 to 16 GHz is reported. The device has been designed based on coplanar waveguide architecture, and realised in thickly electroplated nickel with front-side bulk micromachining of the substrate using a commercial foundry process. The capacitive-to-inductive switchover has been achieved by changing the gap of the interdigitated comb fingers using a chevron microactuator. Experimental characterisation of the device has been conducted, and capacitances ~0.2 pF in the frequency range of 1-16 GHz have been measured in the 'off' state (driving voltage of the microactuator is 0 V), whereas inductances ~0.5 nH in the frequency range of 1-16 GHz have been measured in the 'on' state (driving voltage of the microactuator is ~1 V).