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The influence of anthropogenic and natural geochemical factors on urban soil quality variability: a comparison between Glasgow, UK and Aveiro, Portugal

Rodrigues, S. and Urquhart, G.J. and Hossack, I. and Pereira, M.E. and Duarte, A.C. and Davidson, C.M. and Hursthouse, A.S. and Tucker, P. (2009) The influence of anthropogenic and natural geochemical factors on urban soil quality variability: a comparison between Glasgow, UK and Aveiro, Portugal. Environmental Chemistry Letters, 7 (2). pp. 141-148. ISSN 1610-3653

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Abstract

As part of a harmonised assessment of urban soils (http://www.urbsoil.paisley.ac.uk), we investigated the variability of metal content in soils from Aveiro (Portugal) and Glasgow (UK). Samples were collected from parks and other public open spaces in each city. Metal content (Al, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) and basic soil parameters (texture, CEC, pH, organic matter) were determined and data investigated using principal component analysis (PCA). The two cities differ in absolute levels of metal content reflecting industrial and historical development. Factors identified by PCA included anthropogenic (Cu, Pb, Zn), soil properties and geology, which explain variability when data were assessed based on metal content, soil properties and land use. This study highlights the contribution from geological background even in strongly urbanised environments.