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Preliminary study of long-term wind characteristics of the Mexican Yucatan Peninsula

Soler-Bientz, Rolando and Watson, Simon and Infield, D.G. (2009) Preliminary study of long-term wind characteristics of the Mexican Yucatan Peninsula. Energy Conversion and Management, 50 (7). pp. 1773-1780. ISSN 0196-8904

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Abstract

Mexico's Yucatán Peninsula is one of the most promising areas for wind energy development within the Latin American region but no comprehensive assessment of wind resource has been previously published. This research presents a preliminary analysis of the meteorological parameters relevant to the wind resource in order to find patterns in their long-term behaviour and to establish a foundation for subsequent research into the wind power potential of the Yucatán Peninsula. Three meteorological stations with data measured for a period between 10 and 20 years were used in this study. The monthly trends of ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure and wind speed data were identified and are discussed. The directional behaviour of the winds, their frequency distributions and the related Weibull parameters are presented. Wind power densities for the study sites have been estimated and have been shown to be relatively low (wind power class 1), though a larger number of suitable sites needs to be studied before a definitive resource evaluation can be reported.