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Open Access research that shapes economic thinking...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by the Fraser of Allander Institute (FAI), a leading independent economic research unit focused on the Scottish economy and based within the Department of Economics. The FAI focuses on research exploring economics and its role within sustainable growth policy, fiscal analysis, energy and climate change, labour market trends, inclusive growth and wellbeing.

The open content by FAI made available by Strathprints also includes an archive of over 40 years of papers and commentaries published in the Fraser of Allander Economic Commentary, formerly known as the Quarterly Economic Commentary. Founded in 1975, "the Commentary" is the leading publication on the Scottish economy and offers authoritative and independent analysis of the key issues of the day.

Explore Open Access research by FAI or the Department of Economics - or read papers from the Commentary archive [1975-2006] and [2007-2018]. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Preparation of polymeric microspheres as an ophthalmic drug delivery system for brimonidine tartrate

Couston, R. and McBride, E. and Wilson, C.G. (2009) Preparation of polymeric microspheres as an ophthalmic drug delivery system for brimonidine tartrate. Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, 61 (S1). A22-A23. ISSN 0022-3573

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Abstract

A dramatic increase in the incidence of eye diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration, and inadequate therapeutic control has led to the search for advanced methods of sustained and targeted drug delivery. The development of polymeric devices, matrix implants and microspheres has facilitated the prolonged controlled release of therapies to the target sites. The aim of this study is to prepare brimonidine tartrate-loaded microspheres, which possess suitable characteristics for development into an implantable device that will later exploit the binding properties of ocular melanin to influence the release properties.