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Open Access research which pushes advances in bionanotechnology

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy & Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS) , based within the Faculty of Science.

SIPBS is a major research centre in Scotland focusing on 'new medicines', 'better medicines' and 'better use of medicines'. This includes the exploration of nanoparticles and nanomedicines within the wider research agenda of bionanotechnology, in which the tools of nanotechnology are applied to solve biological problems. At SIPBS multidisciplinary approaches are also pursued to improve bioscience understanding of novel therapeutic targets with the aim of developing therapeutic interventions and the investigation, development and manufacture of drug substances and products.

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Development and validation of an electrogoniometric wrist alignment device

Ugbolue, U.C. and Nicol, A.C. and Maclean, J. (2008) Development and validation of an electrogoniometric wrist alignment device. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part H: Journal of Engineering in Medicine, 222 (5). pp. 637-646. ISSN 0954-4119

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Abstract

This paper reports the development of an instrumented flexible electrogoniometric hand posture corrective device designed specifically for monitoring and controlling the range of motion (ROM) at the hand and wrist. The device, known as the wrist alignment device (WAD), consists of flexible electrogoniometers attached to a Lycra® glove and a control box housing the WAD circuitry. The WAD controls the wrist ROM within set limits by means of presetting the joint angle ranges prior to commencing measurements, thereby preventing or reducing extreme wrist ulnar deviation, wrist hyperflexion, and wrist hyperextension. Additionally, the device consists of a window comparator, which allows the joint movement always to remain within the set limits. Where the subject's wrist ROM is outside the presettings, a piezo-buzzer is triggered which alerts the subject to reduce the ROM, thereby ensuring that the joint angles are always kept within the preset angle range. All instrumentation associated with the development of the device underwent calibration. As a device, it has widespread applications within the office and clinical environment. Preliminary results indicate that reliable measurements based on ROM settings can be obtained when using the WAD.