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Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

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Toxoplasma infection and response to novelty in mice

Hay, J. and Aitken, P.P. and Graham, D.I. (1984) Toxoplasma infection and response to novelty in mice. Parasitology Research (Zeitschrift fur Parasitenkunde), 70 (5). pp. 575-588. ISSN 0044-3255

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Abstract

Three groups of mice were infected with Toxoplasma and used for behavioral testing using a Y-maze. One group was infected when adult and two groups congenitally, one of these born to dams infected during gestation, the other to dams chronically infected prior to mating. In an initial habituation period each mouse was exposed to a black arm and stem of the maze, entrance to a white arm being blocked by a transparent door. In a subsequent free-choice trial both arms were black and the mouse was free to explore all parts of the maze. During both periods infected mice were more active than controls. Infected mice engaged in less grooming behaviour indicative of less approach-avoidance conflict than controls prior to entry into a choice arm at the beginning of the free-choice trial. It is suggested that the reported behavioural changes would lead to dissemination of the infection in the environment by ultimately making infected mouse intermediate hosts more susceptible to predation by domestic cats, the definitive hosts of Toxoplasma.