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Effects of chemical modifications of Pa-11, a phospholipase A2 from the venom of Australian king brown snake (Pseudechis australis), on its biological activities

Takasaki, C. and Sugama, A. and Yanagita, A. and Tamiya, N. and Rowan, E.G. and Harvey, A.L. (1990) Effects of chemical modifications of Pa-11, a phospholipase A2 from the venom of Australian king brown snake (Pseudechis australis), on its biological activities. Toxicon, 28 (1). pp. 107-117. ISSN 0041-0101

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Abstract

Pa-11, a phospholipase A2 isolated from the venom of an Australian elapid snake Pseudechis australis, was chemically modified and its enzymic, neuromuscular and lethal activities were studied. Carboxymethylation of Met-8 gave a derivative with 2% of the enzymic activity and less than 3% of the lethal activity of native Pa-11; it had about 5% of the original ability to block directly and indirectly stimulated mouse phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm preparations. Nitrophenylsulfenylation of tryptophanyl residues at positions 31 and 69 caused loss of all activities. Amidination of all 14 lysyl residues gave a derivative with 41% and 16% of the enzymic and lethal activities, respectively, but with less than 5% of the original neuromuscular blocking activity. Mono-carbamoylation of lysyl residues at positions 58, 63, 81 and 85 was achieved. The most abundant derivative, 58-carbamoyl-lysine Pa-11 was enzymically 130% and lethally 100% as active as native Pa-11, but it had only about 20% of the native's neuromuscular activity in vitro. 63-Carbamoyl-lysine Pa-11 had 10% of the enzymic and 20% of the lethal activities, respectively; however, it retained at least 50% of its ability to block neuromuscular transmission in vitro, while losing most of its activity to block directly stimulated muscle contractions. 81- and 85-Carbamoyl derivatives have the same enzymic and lethal activities as the original protein, but the 85 derivative had less than 10% of the native neuromuscular activity. Hence, modifications of lysine residues at positions 58, 63 and 85 seem to be particularly significant in altering the neuromuscular, but not enzymic, activity of Pa-11, perhaps by altering the ability of the toxin to bind to its target on nerve and muscle membranes. Modification at position 63 appeared to lead to a dissociation of effects on neuromuscular transmission and directly on muscle cells.