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Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Department of Work, Employment & Organisation based within Strathclyde Business School.

Better understanding the nature of work and labour within the globalised political economy is a focus of the 'Work, Labour & Globalisation Research Group'. This involves researching the effects of new forms of labour, its transnational character and the gendered aspects of contemporary migration. A Scottish perspective is provided by the Scottish Centre for Employment Research (SCER). But the research specialisms of the Department of Work, Employment & Organisation go beyond this to also include front-line service work, leadership, the implications of new technologies at work, regulation of employment relations and workplace innovation.

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Properties of second order transitions in Argonne Premium coals

Mackinnon, A.J. and Hall, P.J. (1996) Properties of second order transitions in Argonne Premium coals. Fuel, 75 (1). pp. 85-88. ISSN 0016-2361

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Abstract

Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has been used to investigate the thermal transitions occurring for a series of eight Argonne Premium coals. Each of the coals was subjected to different heating/cooling profiles in order to determine the effect of cooling at varying rates on the second order process and to determine the effect of temperature of exposure on the second order process. The variable cooling rate scans showed that the position of the transition increased with decreasing cooling rate of the previous scan. The sequential heating scans demonstrated that the rank of coal had a direct influence on the resistance of the second order process to exposure to heat. Low rank coals showed a greater degree of resistance and this was assumed to be related to the density of non-covalent bonds within the structure.