Picture of UK Houses of Parliament

Leading national thinking on politics, government & public policy through Open Access research

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the School of Government & Public Policy, based within the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences.

Research here is 1st in Scotland for research intensity and spans a wide range of domains. The Department of Politics demonstrates expertise in understanding parties, elections and public opinion, with additional emphases on political economy, institutions and international relations. This international angle is reflected in the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC) which conducts comparative research on public policy. Meanwhile, the Centre for Energy Policy provides independent expertise on energy, working across multidisciplinary groups to shape policy for a low carbon economy.

Explore the Open Access research of the School of Government & Public Policy. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Effect of an exercise consultation on maintenance of physical activity after completion of phase III exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation

Hughes, Adrienne and Mutrie, Nanette and MacIntyre, Paul D. (2007) Effect of an exercise consultation on maintenance of physical activity after completion of phase III exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation. European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, 14 (1). pp. 114-121. ISSN 1741-8267

Full text not available in this repository.Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

Many patients do not maintain physical activity levels after completion of phase III exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation. This study determined the effect of an exercise consultation on maintenance of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness 12 months after completion of a phase III exercise programme. Seventy cardiac patients were randomized to the experimental (exercise consultation and exercise information) or control groups (exercise information only). Outcomes recorded at baseline, 6 and 12 months were: physical activity (stage of change, 7-day recall, accelerometer), cardiorespiratory fitness, lipids, quality of life, anxiety and depression. Both groups were regularly active at baseline. The between-group difference for the change in total activity (min/week) assessed by the 7-day recall was significant from baseline to 12 months [98% confidence interval (CI) -295, -20]. Total activity was maintained in the experimental group (98% CI -63, 154) and significantly decreased in the control group (115 min/week; 98% CI -228, -28) from baseline to 12 months. The between-group difference for the change in accelerometer counts/week was not significant from baseline to 6 (98% CI -1 143 720, 607 430) or 12 months (98% CI -1 131 128, 366 473). A comparable, significant decrease in peak oxygen uptake occurred from baseline to 12 months in experimental (1.8 ml/kg per min; 98% CI -3.2, -0.3) and control participants (2.3 ml/kg per min; -3.8, -0.8). Lipids, quality of life, anxiety and depression were normal at baseline and did not significantly change in either group over time. Exercise consultation was effective in maintaining self-reported physical activity, but not peak oxygen uptake, for 12 months after completion of phase III.