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Maskless ultraviolet photolithography based on CMOS-driven micro-pixel light emitting diodes

Elfstrom, D. and Guilhabert, B.J.E. and McKendry, J. and Poland, S.P. and Gong, Z. and Massoubre, D. and Valentine, G.J. and Gu, E. and Dawson, M.D. and Richardson, E. and Rae, B.R. and Blanco-Gomez, G. and Cooper, J.M. and Henderson, R.K. (2009) Maskless ultraviolet photolithography based on CMOS-driven micro-pixel light emitting diodes. Optics Express, 17 (26). pp. 23522-23529. ISSN 1094-4087

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Abstract

We report on an approach to ultraviolet (UV) photolithography and direct writing where both the exposure pattern and dose are determined by a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) controlled micro-pixellated light emitting diode array. The 370 nm UV light from a demonstrator 8 x 8 gallium nitride micro-pixel LED is projected onto photoresist covered substrates using two back-to-back microscope objectives, allowing controlled demagnification. In the present setup, the system is capable of delivering up to 8.8 W/cm2 per imaged pixel in circular spots of diameter approximately 8 microm. We show example structures written in positive as well as in negative photoresist.