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In vivo contact stresses at the radiocarpal joint using a finite element method of the complete wrist joint

Gislason, Magnus K. and Nash, David H. and Stansfield, Benedict (2008) In vivo contact stresses at the radiocarpal joint using a finite element method of the complete wrist joint. Journal of Biomechanics, 41 (Supple). S147-S147. ISSN 0021-9290

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    Abstract

    A small number of cadaveric studies have been carried out looking at the force transmission through the radiocarpal joint. In this study subject specific finite element models were created of the whole wrist joint using measured biomechanical data to capture the forces acting on the wrist with the hand generating a maximum gripping force.