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Modelling of the performance of a building-mounted ducted wind turbine

Watson, S.J. and Infield, D.G. and Barton, J.P. and Wylie, S.J. (2007) Modelling of the performance of a building-mounted ducted wind turbine. Journal of Physics Conference Series, 75 (1). ISSN 1742-6588

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Abstract

This paper presents computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling of the performance of a building-mounted ducted wind turbine. A resistive volume within the duct is used to represent a cross-flow turbine and different diffuser geometries have been investigated. A comparison is made between the power performance ratio of such a building-mounted ducted wind turbine rotor predicted by CFD calculations and those predicted on the basis of one-dimensional (1D) theory. Good agreement is seen between the two approaches for a freestanding duct but deviations are seen for the building-mounted case for the calculated power performance ratio apparently due to asymmetry in the flow profile entering the duct and the flow geometry around the combination of building and duct.