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Detection of ultra-wide-band impulsive noise in a 400 kv air insulated electricity substation

Shan, Q. and Glover, I.A. and Bhatti, S.A. and Atkinson, R.C. and Portugues, I. and Moore, P.J. and Rutherford, R. (2009) Detection of ultra-wide-band impulsive noise in a 400 kv air insulated electricity substation. In: CIRED 2009 International Conference on Electricity Distribution, 1900-01-01.

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Abstract

A measurement campaign has been carried out in 400kV air insulated electricity substation to characterise and model radio frequency impulsive noise with a view to assessing its impact on wireless network technologies. The relatively recent availability of new technologies such as WiFi, Bluetooth and Zigbee means that particular emphasis has been put on higher frequency bands (e.g. 2.4, 5 GHz) than have previously been investigated. A detection system to measure wideband noise over a spectrum extending up to 5.1 GHz has been designed, implemented and deployed in a large electricity substation in central Scotland. Results based on a preliminary analysis of the recorded data are reported.