Picture of DNA strand

Pioneering chemical biology & medicinal chemistry through Open Access research...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Department of Pure & Applied Chemistry, based within the Faculty of Science.

Research here spans a wide range of topics from analytical chemistry to materials science, and from biological chemistry to theoretical chemistry. The specific work in chemical biology and medicinal chemistry, as an example, encompasses pioneering techniques in synthesis, bioinformatics, nucleic acid chemistry, amino acid chemistry, heterocyclic chemistry, biophysical chemistry and NMR spectroscopy.

Explore the Open Access research of the Department of Pure & Applied Chemistry. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Development of Strathclyde University Data Logging System (SUDALS) for use with flexible electrogoniometers

Indra Mohan, V.P. and Valsan, G. and Rowe, P.J. (2009) Development of Strathclyde University Data Logging System (SUDALS) for use with flexible electrogoniometers. In: Biodevices 2009: International Conference on Biomedical Electronics and Devices, 2009-01-14 - 2009-01-17.

Full text not available in this repository.Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

We have developed a 6 channel battery operated remote control microprocessor based system that collects data from flexible electrogoniometers and force sensing resistors attached to the lower extremities of the body. During functional activities, the user-friendly system stores the data from these transducers and transfers the same to a PC at the end of the recording period via a bluetooth connection. Software on the PC then displays the angular displacement and allows visual inspection of the entire sequence of recordings or particular events of interest. This system was tested on 10 normal subjects and the pattern pertaining to the flexion/extension of knee during range of activities of daily living (ADL) such as walking, ascending and descending stairs, in and out of a chair and deep squatting were recorded and found to be reproducible and similar to those reported in the literature. This paper was presented at Biodevices 2009: International Conference on Biomedical Electronics and Devices.