Picture of boy being examining by doctor at a tuberculosis sanatorium

Understanding our future through Open Access research about our past...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Centre for the Social History of Health & Healthcare (CSHHH), based within the School of Humanities, and considered Scotland's leading centre for the history of health and medicine.

Research at CSHHH explores the modern world since 1800 in locations as diverse as the UK, Asia, Africa, North America, and Europe. Areas of specialism include contraception and sexuality; family health and medical services; occupational health and medicine; disability; the history of psychiatry; conflict and warfare; and, drugs, pharmaceuticals and intoxicants.

Explore the Open Access research of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Image: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Wellcome Collection - CC-BY.

Disability in patients with chronic patellofemoral pain syndrome : a randomised controlled trial of VMO selective training versus general quadriceps strengthening

Syme, G. and Rowe, P.J. and Martin, D. and Daly, G. (2009) Disability in patients with chronic patellofemoral pain syndrome : a randomised controlled trial of VMO selective training versus general quadriceps strengthening. Manual Therapy, 14 (3). pp. 252-263. ISSN 1356-689X

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

This study was a prospective single blind randomised controlled trial to compare the effects of rehabilitation with emphasis on retraining the vastus medialis (VMO) component of the quadriceps femoris muscle and rehabilitation with emphasis on general strengthening of the quadriceps femoris muscles on pain, function and Quality of Life in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Patients with PFPS (n=69) were recruited from a hospital orthopaedic clinic and randomised into three groups: (1) physiotherapy with emphasis on selectively retraining the VMO (Selective); (2) physiotherapy with emphasis on general strengthening of the quadriceps femoris muscles (General); and (3) a no-treatment control group (Control). The three groups were then compared before and after an eight-week rehabilitation period. The Selective and General groups demonstrated statistically significant and 'moderate' to 'large' effect size reductions in pain when compared to the Control group. Both the Selective and General groups displayed statistically significant and 'moderate' and 'large' effect size improvements in subjective function and Quality of Life compared to the Control group. Knee flexion excursion during the stance phase of gait, demonstrated that there were no statistical significant differences and only 'trivial' to 'small' effect size differences between the Selective or General groups and the Control group. A large number of PFPS patients can experience significant improvements in pain, function and Quality of Life, at least in the short term, with quadriceps femoris rehabilitation, with or without emphasis on selective activation of the VMO component. Both approaches would seem acceptable for rehabilitating patients with PFPS. It may be appropriate to undertake exercises involving selective activation of the vastus medialis early in the rehabilitation process, however, clinicians should not overly focus on selective activation before progressing rehabilitation, especially in more chronic cases with significant participation restrictions.