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Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

Explore research outputs by the European Policies Research Centre...

Ubiquitous entity interactions and dispatcher architecture

Tarus, H.K. and Bush, J.M. and Irvine, J. and Dunlop, J. (2007) Ubiquitous entity interactions and dispatcher architecture. In: IEEE 66th Vehicular Technology Conference, 2007-09-30 - 2007-10-03.

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Abstract

Ubiquitous service provision demands a flexible, low complexity and small foot-print platform that can perform in heterogeneous devices. Agent technology is a design paradigm that promises to take device and service complexity from the user. The Java agent development environment (JADE) is an agent platform wholly developed in Java and with the lightweight extensible agent platform (LEAP) extension can be deployed in limited capability devices. In this paper, we describe the deployment of JADE as a ubiquitous electronic market platform for trading of adaptation services. We then statistically measure JADE's transport protocol efficiency over wireless WAN networks vis-a-vis traditional remote technologies. Our tests are unique in the sense that we benchmarked our results with working devices over real-networks. Our results show that the use of an electronic market results in a linear rise in download time as file sizes increases while using plain message passing technique results in a sub-exponential rise.