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Experimental demonstration and scalability analysis of a four-node 102-Gchip/s fast frequency-hopping time-spreading optical CDMA network

Baby, Varghese and Glesk, Ivan and Runser, Robert J. and Fischer, Russell and Huang, Yue Kai and Bres, Camille Sophie and Kwong, Wing C. and Curtis, Thomas H. and Prucnal, Paul R. (2005) Experimental demonstration and scalability analysis of a four-node 102-Gchip/s fast frequency-hopping time-spreading optical CDMA network. IEEE Photonics Technology Letters, 17 (1). pp. 253-255. ISSN 1041-1135

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Abstract

We present experimental and simulation results from a 102-Gchips/s incoherent wavelength-hopping time-spreading optical code-division multiple-access testbed, utilizing four 50-GHz ITU grid wavelengths. Error-free operation of four users is obtained with an effective power penalty ∼0.5 dB. Simulation studies show scalability to >10 users with an effective power penalty of ∼4 dB. The simulation study of the impact of asynchronous access on the performance allows for a complete network design from an engineering viewpoint.