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World class computing and information science research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

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Ultrasensitive DNA detection using oligonucleotide-silver nanoparticle conjugates

Thompson, D.G. and Enright, A. and Faulds, K. and Smith, W.E. and Graham, D. (2008) Ultrasensitive DNA detection using oligonucleotide-silver nanoparticle conjugates. Analytical Chemistry, 80 (8). pp. 2805-2810. ISSN 0003-2700

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Abstract

Oligonucleotide−gold nanoparticle (OGN) conjugates are powerful tools for the detection of target DNA sequences due to the unique properties conferred upon the oligonucleotide by the nanoparticle. Practically all the research and applications of these conjugates have used gold nanoparticles to the exclusion of other noble metal nanoparticles. Here we report the synthesis of oligonucleotide−silver nanoparticle (OSN) conjugates and demonstrate their use in a sandwich assay format. The OSN conjugates have practically identical properties to their gold analogues and due to their vastly greater extinction coefficient both visual and absorption analyses can occur at much lower concentrations. This is the first report of OSN conjugates being successfully used for target DNA detection and offers improved sensitivity which is of interest to a range of scientists.