Picture of smart phone in human hand

World leading smartphone and mobile technology research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by Strathclyde researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in researching exciting new applications for mobile and smartphone technology. But the transformative application of mobile technologies is also the focus of research within disciplines as diverse as Electronic & Electrical Engineering, Marketing, Human Resource Management and Biomedical Enginering, among others.

Explore Strathclyde's Open Access research on smartphone technology now...

Cytotoxic responses to 405 nm light exposure in mammalian and bacterial cells : involvement of reactive oxygen species

Ramakrishnan, Praveen and Maclean, Michelle and MacGregor, Scott J. and Anderson, John G. and Grant, M. Helen (2016) Cytotoxic responses to 405 nm light exposure in mammalian and bacterial cells : involvement of reactive oxygen species. Toxicology in Vitro, 33. pp. 54-62. ISSN 0887-2333

[img]
Preview
Text (Ramakrishnan-etal-TiV2016-cytotoxic-responses-to-405-nm-light-exposure-in-mammalian-and-bacterial-cells)
Ramakrishnan_etal_TiV2016_cytotoxic_responses_to_405_nm_light_exposure_in_mammalian_and_bacterial_cells.pdf - Final Published Version
License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 logo

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Light at wavelength 405 nm is an effective bactericide. Previous studies showed that exposing mammalian cells to 405 nm light at 36 J/cm2 (a bactericidal dose) had no significant effect on normal cell function, although at higher doses (54 J/cm2), mammalian cell death became evident. This research demonstrates that mammalian and bacterial cell toxicity induced by 405 nm light exposure is accompanied by reactive oxygen species production, as detected by generation of fluorescence from 6-carboxy-2’,7’- dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. As indicators of the resulting oxidative stress in mammalian cells, a decrease in intracellular reduced glutathione content and a corresponding increase in the efflux of oxidised glutathione was observed from 405 nm light treated cells. The mammalian cells were significantly protected from dying at 54 J/cm2 in the presence of catalase, which detoxifies H2O2. Bacterial cells were significantly protected by sodium pyruvate (H2O2 scavenger) and by a combination of free radical scavengers (sodium pyruvate, dimethyl thiourea (OH scavenger) and catalase) at 162 and 324 J/cm2. Results herefore suggested that the cytotoxic mechanism of 405 nm light in mammalian cells and bacteria could be oxidative stress involving predominantly H2O2 generation, with other ROS contributing to the damage.