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In vitro analyses of the toxicity, immunological, and gene expression effects of cobalt-chromium alloy wear debris and Co ions derived from metal-on-metal hip implants

Posada, Olga M. and Tate, Rothwelle J. and Meek, R.M. Dominic and Grant, M. Helen (2015) In vitro analyses of the toxicity, immunological, and gene expression effects of cobalt-chromium alloy wear debris and Co ions derived from metal-on-metal hip implants. Lubricants, 3 (3). pp. 539-568.

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Abstract

Joint replacement has proven to be an extremely successful and cost-effective means of relieving arthritic pain and improving quality of life for recipients. Wear debris-induced osteolysis is, however, a major limitation and causes orthopaedic implant aseptic loosening, and various cell types including macrophages, monocytes, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts, are involved. During the last few years, there has been increasing concern about metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacements regarding adverse reactions to metal debris associated with the MoM articulation. Even though MoM-bearing technology was initially aimed to extend the durability of hip replacements and to reduce the requirement for revision, they have been reported to release at least three times more cobalt and chromium ions than metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) hip replacements. As a result, the toxicity of metal particles and ions produced by bearing surfaces, both locally in the periprosthetic space and systemically, became a concern. Several investigations have been carried out to understand the mechanisms responsible for the adverse response to metal wear debris. This review aims at summarising in vitro analyses of the toxicity, immunological, and gene expression effects of cobalt ions and wear debris derived from MoM hip implants.