Picture of virus under microscope

Research under the microscope...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs.

Strathprints serves world leading Open Access research by the University of Strathclyde, including research by the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS), where research centres such as the Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre (IBioIC), the Cancer Research UK Formulation Unit, SeaBioTech and the Centre for Biophotonics are based.

Explore SIPBS research

Enhancing self-similar patterns by asymmetric artificial potential functions in partially connected swarms

Punzo, Giuliano and Bennet, Derek James and Macdonald, Malcolm (2011) Enhancing self-similar patterns by asymmetric artificial potential functions in partially connected swarms. In: Towards Autonomous Robotic Systems. Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, 6856 (1st). Institution of Engineering and Technology. ISBN 978-3-642-23231-2

[img] PDF
Punzo_et_al_Pure_Enhancing_self_similar_patterns_by_asymmetric_artificial_potential_..._swarms_2010.pdf - Preprint

Download (331kB)

Abstract

The control of mobile robotic agents is required to be highly reliable. Artificial potential function (APF) methods have previously been assessed in the literature for providing stable and verifiable control, whilst maintaining a high degree of nonlinearity. Further, these methods can, in theory, be characterised by a full analytic treatment. Many examples are available in the literature of the employment of these methods for controlling large ensembles of agents that evolve into minimum energy configurations corresponding in many cases to regular lattices [1-2]. Although regular lattices can present naturally centric symmetry and self-similarity characteristics, more complex formations can also be achieved by several other means. In [3] the equilibrium configuration undergoes bifurcation by changing a parameter belonging to the part of artificial potential that couples the agents to the reference frame. In this work it is shown how the formation shape produced can be controlled in two further ways, resulting in more articulated patterns. Specifically the control applied is to alter the symmetry of interactions amongst agents, and/or by selectively rewiring interagent connections. In the first case, the network of connections remains the same, and may be fully connected.