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Beneath the glass ceiling : explaining gendered role segmentation in call centres

Scholarios, Dora and Taylor, Philip (2011) Beneath the glass ceiling : explaining gendered role segmentation in call centres. Human Relations, 64 (10). pp. 1291-1319. ISSN 0018-7267

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Abstract

Although the call centre is much researched, the literature on gender remains surprisingly undeveloped given the importance of this setting for women’s employment. This study of role segmentation in four call centres demonstrates women’s disproportionate representation in more routinized mass production roles, as opposed to higher status or managerial grades. It also analyses three explanations – human capital, domestic status and supervisor career support. The evidence shows that women face a ‘glass ceiling’, first, on entry to the call centre in terms of human capital disadvantage and levels of domestic constraint and, second, within the call centre in their ability to secure supervisor support for career opportunities. We argue that even for women with similar career aspiration and human capital to men, domestic responsibilities create obstacles before they reach the glass ceiling, especially for managerial roles, and contribute thereafter to reinforcing their concentration in more intensive, lower status work.

Item type: Article
ID code: 34055
Keywords: call centres, careers, gender, gender in organisations, Management. Industrial Management, Strategy and Management, Social Sciences(all), Management of Technology and Innovation
Subjects: Social Sciences > Industries. Land use. Labor > Management. Industrial Management
Department: Strathclyde Business School > Human Resource Management
Related URLs:
    Depositing user: Pure Administrator
    Date Deposited: 18 Oct 2011 12:27
    Last modified: 05 Sep 2014 11:28
    URI: http://strathprints.strath.ac.uk/id/eprint/34055

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