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Mapping erosion-corrosion of WC/Co-Cr based composite coatings: Particle velocity and applied potential effects

Stack, M.M. and Abd El-Badia, T.M. (2006) Mapping erosion-corrosion of WC/Co-Cr based composite coatings: Particle velocity and applied potential effects. Surface and Coatings Technology, 201 (3-4). pp. 1335-1347. ISSN 0257-8972

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Abstract

In studies of erosion-corrosion of composite based coatings, there have been few attempts to map the mechanisms of the erosion-corrosion process. This is despite the fact cermet-based coatings are being increasingly used to combat erosion on pipelines and pumps where the degradation is caused by a combination of sand particles and seawater. In addition, the interactions between the processes of erosion and corrosion have only been evaluated for a limited range of conditions, despite the fact that erosion-corrosion occurs over a wide range of variables in practice. In this study, the effects of velocity, particle concentration and potential were evaluated for a WC/Co-Cr based coating. The extent of wastage was assessed using scanning electron microscopy and weight loss techniques. Mechanisms of erosion-corrosion were identified from the results. The results were used to generate erosion-corrosion mechanism maps for the coated and uncoated specimens. Velocity/potential maps were constructed showing the transitions between the erosion-corrosion regimes as a function of these parameters. The extent of synergy was also superimposed on such maps, showing the conditions where synergistic effects were likely to be at a minimum for the main process parameters.